Call Us Today | 740.452.7575 | Follow Us | | |
Auto Insurance AUTO

Auto insurance protects you against financial loss if you have an accident.

Read More
Homeowners Insurance HOME

A standard policy insures the home itself and the things you keep in it.

Read More
Business Insurance BUSINESS

Discover the perfect insurance options to meet your specific and unique needs.

Read More
Life Insurance LIFE/HEALTH

Browse a variety of insurance options in order to find the right one for you.

Read More

Water has a unique property in that it expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the "strength" of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break. Pipes that freeze most frequently are those that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hoses, swimming pool supply lines, water sprinkler lines, and water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets. Also, pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation are also subject to freezing. Pipe freezing is a particular problem in warmer climates where pipes often run through un-insulated walls or under insulated attics or crawl spaces.


                                                                                                                  

Preventing Frozen Pipes

Before the onset of cold weather, prevent freezing of these water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations:

 - Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.

 - Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can extend without causing the pipe to break.

 - Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located and are in unheated areas. Look in the basement, crawl space, attic, garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated. A hot water supply line can freeze just as a cold water supply line can freeze if the water is not running through the pipe and the water temperature in the pipe is cold.

 - Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Many products are available at your local building supplies retailer.

To Thaw Frozen Pipes

Safety first - Propane torches or an open flame can ignite wood beams, flooring and other combustible materials around pipes. Use a hair dryer to thaw frozen pipes. Pipes that warm too fast can break.

If you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Locate the suspected frozen area of the water pipe. Likely place include pipes running against exterior walls or where your water service enters your home through the foundation.

 - Keep the faucet open. As you treat the frozen pipe and the frozen area begins to melt, water will begin to flow through the frozen area. Running water through the pipe will help melt more ice in the pipe.

 - Apply heat to the section of pipe using an electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe, and electric hair dryer, a portable space heater (kept 3 feet away from flammable materials), or wrapping pipes with towels soaked in hot water. Do not use a blowtorch, keroses or propane heater, charcoal stove, or other open flame device. A blowtorch can make water in a frozen pipe boil and cause the pipe to explode. All open flames in homes present a serious fire danger, as well as a severe risk of exposure to lethal carbon monoxide.

 - Apply heat until full water pressure is restored. If you are unable to locate the fozen area, if the frozen area is not accessible, or if you cannot thaw the pipe, call a licensed plumber.

 - Check all other faucets in your home to find out if you have additional frozen pipes. If one pipe freezes, others may freeze too.
Posted 3:25 PM

Share |


NOTICE: This blog and website are made available by the publisher for educational and informational purposes only. It is not be used as a substitute for competent insurance, legal, or tax advice from a licensed professional in your state. By using this blog site you understand that there is no broker client relationship between you and the blog and website publisher.
Blog Archive


View Mobile Version
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
Site Map | Privacy Policy | © Copyright. All rights reserved.
Powered by Insurance Website Builder